STATE OF EMERGENCY

Talbot County, Maryland

Emergency Services: 410-770-8160
Health Department: 410-819-5600

Talbot County has convened an Operational Working Group made up of officials from the Talbot County Health Department, Talbot County Emergency Services, Talbot County Government, Talbot County’s towns, University of Maryland Shore Regional Health, law enforcement agencies, and many other community partners. This group is monitoring this evolving situation closely and will release information each week day to share any updates affecting the citizens of Talbot County.

To read the complete update, please click here.
Para leer la actualización completa, haga clic aquí.

Number of Confirmed Cases in Talbot County

Community Partners

Anne Arundel Medical Center

Bay Hundred Senior Center

Brookletts Place The Talbot County Senior Center

Chesapeake College

Delmarva Community Transit

Easton Utilities

For All Seasons

Neighborhood Service Center

St. Michaels Community Center

Talbot County Courts

Talbot County Chamber of Commerce

Talbot County Department of Social Services

Talbot County Economic Development & Tourism

Talbot County Free Library

Talbot County Public Schools

Talbot Humane

Town of
Easton

Town of
Oxford

Town of
Queen Anne

Town of
St. Michaels

Town of
Trappe

University of Maryland Extension

University of Maryland Shore Health System

YMCA of the Chesapeake

COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions
From the Centers For Disease Control And Prevention

For additional information, visit the CDC website.

What is COVID-19?
On February 11, 2020, the World Health Organization announced an official name for the disease that is causing the 2019 novel coronavirus outbreak, first identified in Wuhan China. The new name of this disease is coronavirus disease 2019, abbreviated as COVID-19. In COVID-19, ‘CO’ stands for ‘corona,’ ‘VI’ for ‘virus,’ and ‘D’ for disease. Formerly, this disease was referred to as “2019 novel coronavirus” or “2019-nCoV”.
There are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild upper-respiratory tract illnesses. COVID-19 is a new disease, caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus that has not previously been seen in humans.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?
Current symptoms reported for patients with COVID-19 have included mild to severe respiratory illness with fever, cough, and difficulty breathing.

What is the test for COVID-19?
CDC has developed a new laboratory test kit for use in testing patient specimens for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19. The test kit is called the “Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2019-Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Real-Time Reverse Transcriptase (RT)-PCR Diagnostic Panel.” This test is intended for use with upper and lower respiratory specimens collected from persons who meet CDC criteria for COVID-19 testing.
Using the CDC-developed diagnostic test, a negative result means that the virus that causes COVID-19 was not found in the person’s sample. In the early stages of infection, it is possible the virus will not be detected.

How does COVID-19 spread?
The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person. Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets.
The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas.

Can COVID-19 be spread through food, packaging or products?
Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food, packaging or other products. In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks at ambient, refrigerated, or frozen temperatures.
Before preparing or eating food it is important to always wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds for general food safety. Throughout the day wash your hands after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom.
It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with imported goods and there have not been any cases of COVID-19 in the United States associated with imported goods.

Can I get COVID-19 from pets?
While this virus seems to have emerged from an animal source, it is now spreading from person-to-person in China. There is no reason to think that any animals including pets in the United States might be a source of infection with this new coronavirus. To date, CDC has not received any reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19.

Does weather affect the spread of COVID-19?
It is not yet known whether weather and temperature impact the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months.

How can I protect myself?
Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid close contact with people who are sick and put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community.
Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
CDC does not recommend that people who are well wear a facemask to protect themselves from respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19. You should only wear a mask if a healthcare professional recommends it. A facemask should be used by people who have COVID-19 and are showing symptoms. This is to protect others from the risk of getting infected. The use of facemasks also is crucial for health workers and other people who are taking care of someone infected with COVID-19 in close settings (at home or in a health care facility).

How is COVID-19 treated?
There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for COVID-19. People with COVID-19 should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms.
Quarantine is usually established for the incubation period of the communicable disease, which is the span of time during which people have developed illness after exposure. For COVID-19, the period of quarantine is 14 days from the last date of exposure, because 14 days is the longest incubation period seen for similar coronaviruses. Someone who has been released from COVID-19 quarantine is not considered a risk for spreading the virus to others because they have not developed illness during the incubation period.

For additional information, visit the CDC website.

Emergency Services: 410-770-8160 | Health Department: 410-819-5600